Tag Archives: Centreville

CENTREVILLE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

Aug 6 – CENTREVILLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY plan presentation related to business growth & retention activity. 7pm. Liberty Bldg, 107 N. Liberty St, 2nd floor. 410-758-1180.

Centreville Becomes an NWF Certified Community Wildlife Habitat™

Leading a nationwide trend in community concern for habitat loss, Centreville, Maryland has officially been designated as a National Wildlife Federation (NWF) Community Wildlife Habitat.

Centreville is the 74th in the country, third in Maryland, and the very first on the Eastern Shore to receive this honor. A Community Wildlife Habitat project creates multiple habitat areas in backyards, schoolyards, businesses, community gardens, parkland and other spaces. NWF’s Certified Wildlife Habitat program has been helping people take personal action on behalf of wildlife for more than 40 years. The program engages homeowners, businesses, schools, churches, parks and other institutions that want to make their communities wildlife-friendly.

“Centreville, the town with a past, a present and a future again lives up to its motto. Centreville’s certification as a National Wildlife Federation Community Wildlife Habitat underscores the citizens’ value of nature and its environment, started by President Theodore Roosevelt back in 1901 and continues today and into our children’s future, Centreville Town Council President Smokey Sigler said. Well Done Centreville, well done.”

NWF commends the dedicated volunteers who led the charge for their wildlife conservation efforts and for coming together for a common purpose – to create a community where people and wildlife can flourish. The Centreville team consisted of residents Lynn and Gabby Caligiuri, Kellen McCluskey, Sandy Simpson, Kerry Brandt, Carol Hellmann, Celynda Frank, Pat Bragg, Linda Blume, Stacy Quinn and Jim Watson.

“Providing a home for wildlife in our cities – whether it’s at home, or in schools, businesses or parks – is the demonstration of a healthy and active eco-system,” said National Wildlife Federation Naturalist David Mizejewski. “There is no more rewarding way to stay connected to nature right outside your
door.”

“The Town of Centreville is a natural to receive this distinction. With so many environmentally minded residents who maintain beautiful and wildlife friendly gardens, yards and farms, and Kennard Elementary, Centreville Middle and Centreville Elementary schools with their schoolyard habitats and outdoor classrooms, it is no surprise that Centreville is the first community on the Eastern Shore to achieve this certification,” Lynn Caligiuri, Chair of the Centreville Community Certification team said. “The Town’s dedication to a safe and sustainable environment and its location in the Chesapeake Bay watershed make achieving this national certification a perfect fit.”

The National Wildlife Federation along with mascot Ranger Rick, will recognize Centreville at a ceremony on November 2nd in the town square, during Centreville Day at 11:15 am. The public is invited and encouraged to share in the celebration. For more details, “like” the “Centreville Community Wildlife Habitat Project”, Facebook page.

For more information on the Community Wildlife Habitat program, please visit: www.nwf.org/community.

Remembering the Past: Project Flashback Seeks to Preserve Centerville’s Unique History

By Avra Sullivan

Did you know there used to be an Opera House next to Edward’s Pharmacy? Or that Callahan’s Gas and Appliance used to be a carriage house? Were you aware that in the 1950’s during snow days, the police would close off Liberty Street so the kids could go sledding? I discovered these and more interesting facts about the town of Centreville by talking to Bob Pino, who is involved with the group Project Flashback Centreville. The group seeks to bring photos, history and anecdotes from Centreville’s past into the present. Project Flashback started as an idea for the annual Block Party. So many stories of “long ago” were told at Bob’s store, An Optical Galleria, that he decided to bring them to the rest of the town so they would not be lost. The Project Flashback Group, which is comprised of several people interested in Centreville’s unique history, meets the 4th Wednesday of every month at 6pm at Bob’s store. They collect photos, historical facts and personal stories to make posters to hang in the windows of local shops.

The posters will show the history of the store or building, as well as photos from its past. “We hope to include as many area stores as possible,” says Bob. They hope to form a walking tour of Centreville both for locals and town visitors. Bob explains that most of what they have uncovered has been from personal memories of those who have lived here for many years, as well as from old newspapers and individuals from the historical society. The research has been intense and they have just scratched the surface as more and more facts emerge. The Group has not yet asked the town for permission to dig through the archives, which are not computerized but in many, many boxes. Bob hopes this will become a community project, getting as many people involved as possible.

Anyone who would like to take part in the monthly meetings, assist with research, or that has information on the history of Centreville or any buildings or businesses can contact Bob at his store at 410-262-9415 or through the group’s Facebook Page, Project Flashback-Centreville. He also urges anyone that has a photograph from the past to contact him. The originals can be scanned and copied at Edwards Pharmacy and then can be returned to the owner.

Centreville’s “Main Street Maryland” Designation Announced

Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Secretary Raymond A. Skinner announced today that Centreville was among three municipalities newly designated as Main Street Maryland communities. Created in 1998, Main Street Maryland is a comprehensive downtown revitalization program that is recognized nationally as a model for Smart Growth. “With public and private investment in our traditional commercial districts, we can enable entrepreneurship and job creation in these communities,” said Secretary Skinner.

“Centreville is extremely proud to be selected as part of this nationally recognized program to build on the economic potential of our downtown businesses,” said Centreville Town Council President Tim McCluskey, adding that “I am delighted that the State of Maryland has recognized the Town’s commitment to revitalizing its core business district.”

Centreville is the latest addition, along with Ocean City and Sykesville, to the state’s roster of 23 Main Street Maryland communities in 16 counties. Council Member George “Smokey” Sigler noted that “We have been working on what the Town can do to help its businesses thrive, grow, attract new businesses, and speed economic development. Being the first Main Street designated in Queen Anne’s County is a great step to reinforce these efforts of the Town, our citizens, and our business community.”

“Strong main streets with thriving business districts and neighborhoods are the foundation for healthy, sustainable communities,” said Governor Martin O’Malley. “These three towns will be great additions to the Main Street Maryland program due to their strong commitment to downtown revitalization, and they will surely serve as great examples of Smart, Green & Growing communities.”

The Main Street Maryland Program uses the Main Street Four-Point Approach for commercial revitalization, developed by the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s National Main Street Center. Main Street Maryland also incorporated a Fifth Point: “Clean, Safe, and Green”. The Five Points are:

o Design which enhances the physical appearance of the commercial district by rehabilitating historic buildings, encouraging supportive new construction, developing sensitive design management systems, and long-term planning;
o Organization which seeks to build consensus and cooperation among the many groups and individuals who have a role in the revitalization process;
o Promotion which supports marketing the traditional commercial district’s assets to customers, potential investors, new businesses, local citizens and visitors;
o Economic Restructuring to strengthen the district’s existing economic base while finding ways to expand it to meet new opportunities and challenges from outlying development; and
o Clean, Safe, and Green through which community leaders form “green teams” to promote beautification, water and energy conservation, and other sustainable development practices.

“Centreville Alive! was created three years ago specifically to implement this Five Point approach,” said Kara Snyder, a Main Street business owner and President of Centreville Alive! “We are so happy that this official designation will help with additional resources to continue strengthening our downtown.”

“I could not be more proud of the Town Hall staff and the volunteers of Centreville Alive! for their efforts to keep a dynamic ‘Main Street’ in Centreville,” said Council Vice President Frank Ogens. “This teamwork exemplifies what a community can accomplish by working together.”

To learn more about the Town of Centreville’s economic development plans or to volunteer on a committee for Centreville’s Main Street program, please attend the next Centreville Business Roundtable at 6:00 PM Thursday evening, March 15th, in the Liberty Building, 107 Liberty Street, Second Floor Meeting Room. You can also visit the new, business-friendly Town web site www.TownofCentreville.org, or contact Town Hall by email TownHall@TownofCentreville.org or phone 410-758-1180.

QA Horse Farm Owner Strikes Deal

A Queen Anne’s County woman who was facing more than 100 counts of animal neglect will soon get many of her horses back. In a plea agreement, Marsha Parkinson received no convictions, which means 60 horses will be returned to her. Last fall, Parkinson had 133 horses seized from her farm in Centreville. Many of the horses were reported to be malnourished and lacked proper care. In court, Parkinson struck a deal with prosecutors to get the horses back, which left some people shaking their heads. The seized horses were taken to a horse rescue in western Maryland and now are headed back to the farm in Queen Anne’s County.

Centreville’s “Main Street Maryland” Designation Announced

Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Secretary Raymond A. Skinner announced today that Centreville was among three municipalities newly designated as Main Street Maryland communities. Created in 1998, Main Street Maryland is a comprehensive downtown revitalization program that is recognized nationally as a model for Smart Growth. “With public and private investment in our traditional commercial districts, we can enable entrepreneurship and job creation in these communities,” said Secretary Skinner.

“Centreville is extremely proud to be selected as part of this nationally recognized program to build on the economic potential of our downtown businesses,” said Centreville Town Council President Tim McCluskey, adding that “I am delighted that the State of Maryland has recognized the Town’s commitment to revitalizing its core business district.”

Centreville is the latest addition, along with Ocean City and Sykesville, to the state’s roster of 23 Main Street Maryland communities in 16 counties. Council Member George “Smokey” Sigler noted that “We have been working on what the Town can do to help its businesses thrive, grow, attract new businesses, and speed economic development. Being the first Main Street designated in Queen Anne’s County is a great step to reinforce these efforts of the Town, our citizens, and our business community.”

“Strong main streets with thriving business districts and neighborhoods are the foundation for healthy, sustainable communities,” said Governor Martin O’Malley. “These three towns will be great additions to the Main Street Maryland program due to their strong commitment to downtown revitalization, and they will surely serve as great examples of Smart, Green & Growing communities.”

The Main Street Maryland Program uses the Main Street Four-Point Approach for commercial revitalization, developed by the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s National Main Street Center. Main Street Maryland also incorporated a Fifth Point: “Clean, Safe, and Green”. The Five Points are:

o Design which enhances the physical appearance of the commercial district by rehabilitating historic buildings, encouraging supportive new construction, developing sensitive design management systems, and long-term planning;
o Organization which seeks to build consensus and cooperation among the many groups and individuals who have a role in the revitalization process;
o Promotion which supports marketing the traditional commercial district’s assets to customers, potential investors, new businesses, local citizens and visitors;
o Economic Restructuring to strengthen the district’s existing economic base while finding ways to expand it to meet new opportunities and challenges from outlying development; and
o Clean, Safe, and Green through which community leaders form “green teams” to promote beautification, water and energy conservation, and other sustainable development practices.

“Centreville Alive! was created three years ago specifically to implement this Five Point approach,” said Kara Snyder, a Main Street business owner and President of Centreville Alive! “We are so happy that this official designation will help with additional resources to continue strengthening our downtown.”

“I could not be more proud of the Town Hall staff and the volunteers of Centreville Alive! for their efforts to keep a dynamic ‘Main Street’ in Centreville,” said Council Vice President Frank Ogens. “This teamwork exemplifies what a community can accomplish by working together.”

To learn more about the Town of Centreville’s economic development plans or to volunteer on a committee for Centreville’s Main Street program, please attend the next Centreville Business Roundtable at 6:00 PM Thursday evening, March 15th, in the Liberty Building, 107 Liberty Street, Second Floor Meeting Room. You can also visit the new, business-friendly Town web site www.TownofCentreville.org, or contact Town Hall by email TownHall@TownofCentreville.org or phone 410-758-1180.

For the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Press Release, click:
http://www.dhcd.state.md.us/Website/About/PublicInfo/NewsEvents/NewsDetail.aspx?newsID=349

For more on the Main Street Maryland Program, click:
http://www.neighborhoodrevitalization.org/Programs/MainStreet/MainStreet.aspx

To visit the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s National Main Street Center, click:
http://www.mainstreet.org/

Centreville Registers Community Wildlife Habitat Project

The National Wildlife Federation announces that the community of Centreville, Maryland is putting out the welcome mat for birds, butterflies and other wildlife, by recently registering its Community Wildlife Habitat™ project with NWF.

The town of Centreville is sending a clear and powerful message to communities all over America that caring people, working together, can help wildlife, wild places and the health of the environment. The residents of Centreville are making a difference in their own community and beyond.

Since 1973, NWF has provided millions of people with the basic guidelines for making their landscapes more hospitable for wildlife. To date, through the Certified Wildlife Habitat™ program, NWF has certified over 147,000 sites including yards, schools, businesses, community gardens and parks, and places of worship. Each of these sites provides the four basic elements that all wildlife need to thrive: food, water, cover and places to raise young.

In addition, NWF has certified fifty-seven entire communities. Centreville is working to become part of this distinguished group. A Community Wildlife Habitat project brings people together for a common purpose – to create a community where people, flora and fauna can flourish. Centreville’s action plan includes a long-term commitment to citizen education about providing habitat for wildlife and employing sustainable gardening practices. These practices include reducing or eliminating the use of chemical pesticides and fertilizers, conserving water, planting native plants, removing invasive plants and composting. Their goal is to certify at least 50 homes, 1 school and 2 businesses, places of worship or other locations.

For more information on becoming involved in Centreville’s efforts to become a certified Community Wildlife Habitat, please contact Lynn Caligiuri at 410-279-0711 or lynnnpf@aol.com . To get started on your own gardening for wildlife adventure, visit NWF’s website at www.nwf.org/gardenforwildlife . The site offers access to continually-updated information and resources for habitat projects, along with a wealth of other information on wildlife and wild places, and how to help protect these precious natural resources. You can also obtain a free application/brochure by calling 1-800-822-9919 or by writing to National Wildlife Federation, 11100 Wildlife Center Drive, Reston, VA 20190

Elderly Man Dies After Space Heater Catches Clothes on Fire

Madison Brown, 91, of Centreville, died from smoke inhalation after an overnight fire that started from a space heater. A caretaker found Brown in his bedroom at his one-story, wood-frame house on Brownsville Road, and investigators pronounced him dead on the scene. Preliminary test results from the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner indicate he died from smoke inhalation. According to the Office of the State Fire Marshal, the fire started when a space heater touched clothes in Brown’s bedroom. The fire made enough soot and smoke to overcome Brown, but then burned out before doing too much damage. Fire safety information is available online at www.firemarshal.state.md.us, on Facebook under Office of the Maryland State Fire Marshal, or at 1-800-525-3124.

QAHS Boy Dies in Crash

Friends and loved ones held a candlelight vigil for Conner Rice, a 15-year-old Queen Anne boy, who died in a crash on the way to school. The collision occurred at U.S. Route 301 and state Route 304. The accident happened as Connor, his brother Hayden Clark Rice, 17, and Brandon Tyler Kaiser, 16, were headed to Queen Anne’s County High School.

Maryland State Police said Hayden Rice, driving a Jeep Grand Cherokee west on Route 304, failed to yield the right of way to traffic on Route 301. A Ford F-250, being driven south on Route 301 by Richard Anthony Niski of Dover, DE struck the passenger side of the Jeep. The Jeep overturned and Kaiser was thrown from the back seat. Connor had been sitting in the front passenger seat.

Both Kaiser and Hayden Rice were flown to the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center for their injuries. Hayden Rice has been discharged from the trauma center, and Kaiser is in fair condition. Niski was treated at and released from Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown.

Connor is the son of Todd and Robin Clark Rice and grew up in Queen Anne. He played several sports, including soccer and Little League baseball, and was a member of the JV cross country team. Also surviving is Hayden, and brother, Nathan James Rice.