Tag Archives: Talbot Humane

Bark In The Park Grows With 10K, More Family Fun

Talbot Humane’s third annual Bark in the Park will feature even more activities for people and pets this year. The free festival takes place rain or shine on Saturday, October 20th, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Idlewild Park in Easton.

The festival starts early for the more athletically inclined, who can enter the new 10K run or 5K fun run/walk. Both start from Easton Middle School, where registration opens at 8 a.m. The 10K begins at 9 a.m. and the 5K at 9:15. The races are sponsored by Annapolis Volvo.

Those who want their canine companions to join them can register for the Dog Walk, which will follow last year’s route through the streets of Easton. The Fun Dog Show also returns, with competitions in ten categories and Best In Show.

Registration fees apply for the runs, Dog Walk and Dog Show, with registration available in advance through the Talbot Humane website, www.talbothumane.org. Registration for the 10K and 5K races also is available through Active.com.

Bark in the Park events at Idlewild Park include Agility Dogs, Easton Police K-9 Unit and Search and Rescue demonstrations. Horse-drawn carriage rides, food, music and kids’ activities add to the entertainment for the whole family, with four-legged members welcome.

Behind all the fun, Talbot Humane’s mission in support of the animals is still the primary focus of Bark in the Park. Local veterinarians will conduct mini-workshops on pet care topics, including nutrition, dental care, flea and tick prevention, spay/neuter and heartworm disease. Area shelters and rescue organizations present a PAWrade of Adoptable Dogs.

Participating vets and organizations currently confirmed include Baywater Animal Rescue, Caroline Humane Society, Community Animal Hospital, Delmarva Dock Dogs, Humane Society of Kent County, Humane Society of the United States, Midshore Veterinary Service, Pet Health Clinic, Pets on Wheels of Delmarva, Queen Anne’s County Animal Services, Spay Now, Talbot County Health Department and Emergency Services, and Veterinary Medical Center.

Festival attendees are encouraged to bring dog or cat food to the event. It will be collected by Pet Pantries for distribution to Talbot Humane and the other rescue groups and shelters.

Talbot Humane alone has more than 200 animals in its care waiting for adoption. To support the escalating expense for the care of these animals, Talbot Humane has a goal of $50,000 for this year’s Bark in the Park fundraiser. Volunteers can take part in the effort and compete online, through a link on Talbot Humane’s website or directly through Active.com. Prizes for the top fundraisers include a one-week stay at a Florida condominium, a NOOK reader with Barnes & Noble gift card, and a $100 gift certificate to a local restaurant.

Patty Crankshaw-Quimby, Executive Director of Talbot Humane, is grateful to the businesses and organizations that are supporting Bark in the Park and Talbot Humane with their sponsorships. WCEI is a top sponsor. Others include Big Dogs, C. Albert Matthews, Easton Elks #1622, Easton Utilities Commission, Foxy’s Harbor Grill, Gone for a Run, Hertrich Chevrolet, M&T Bank, Oxford Lawn & Landscape, PetSmart, Pierson’s Comfort Group, Preston Automotive Group, Provident State Bank, Queenstown Bank, Salisbury Gift & Garden, Three Penny Opera, TriCrown Inn for Pets, What’s Up? Media, Curry Wilford, and the YMCA.

Ultimately, however, Crankshaw-Quimby emphasized that it is the families who come out and enjoy Bark in the Park and all it has to offer who make the event a success for Talbot Humane, the animals and the community. “This is such a fun event for the whole family,” she said. “Bring the dog and the kids, and come out and show your support for all we do for the animals of Talbot County.”

For more information, to make a contribution, or to volunteer, call Talbot Humane at 410-822-0107 or visit www.talbothumane.org.

In photo at left: Charlie Petosa, left, and Charles Riter were the Highest Youth Fundraiser and Highest Adult Fundraiser, respectively, for last year’s Bark in the Park online fundraising effort. Prizes are being offered for the top three fundraisers this year.

In photo above: Participants in the Dog Walk can support Talbot Humane by registering online and recruiting sponsors for their walk.

Walk, Run And Fun At Expanded Bark In The Park

Talbot Humane’s third annual Bark in the Park family festival will feature even more activities for people and pets as it continues to grow in popularity as a community event. The free festival takes place on Saturday, October 20th, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Idlewild Park in Easton.

New this year, Annapolis Volvo is sponsoring a 10K run and a 5K fun run/walk for human participants, starting at 9 and 9:15 a.m., respectively, from Easton Middle School, one block from Idlewild Park. Registration for the races opens there at 8 a.m.

The Dog Walk returns for the canines, along with the Fun Dog Show, which allows owners an opportunity to match their dogs against others in ten categories including talent, looks, size and costumes. L.P. Palmer and his Yorkshire Terrier, Jake, won both Best Look Alike and Best in Show at last year’s Bark in the Park Dog Show.

Registration fees apply for the runs, Dog Walk and Dog Show, with registration available in advance through the Talbot Humane website, www.talbothumane.org. Registration for the 10K and 5K also is available through Active.com.

Those who just want to enjoy a day of dog-watching can bring the entire family out for this community festival focused on Talbot Humane’s mission of caring for the animals of Talbot County. A PAWrade of Adoptable Dogs will give visitors a good look at dogs available for adoption from a number of participating area shelters and rescue organizations. Local veterinarians conduct mini-workshops on selected pet-care topics, with vendors offering a variety of pet-related products.

Agility Dogs and the Easton Police K-9 Unit provide scheduled demonstrations during the event. With horse-drawn carriage rides, food, music and special activities for kids, Bark in the Park offers fun the whole family.

Sponsors still are being recruited to help make this year’s festival even more successful as Talbot Humane’s major fundraising event of the year. WCEI is a top sponsor, with others currently committed including Big Dogs, C. Albert Matthews, Easton Elks #1622, Easton Utilities Commission, Foxy’s Harbor Grill, Gone for a Run, Hertrich Chevrolet, M&T Bank, Oxford Lawn & Landscape, PetSmart, Pierson’s Comfort Group, Preston Automotive Group, Provident State Bank, Queenstown Bank, Salisbury Gift & Garden, What’s Up? Media and the YMCA.

Individual donors also are welcome. Volunteer fundraisers may compete online to see who can gather the most support for the animals through a link on Talbot Humane’s website or directly through Active.com. Last year, Charlie Petosa and Charles Riter earned Highest Youth Fundraiser and Highest Adult Fundraiser honors, respectively. Top fundraisers can win prizes including a one-week stay at a Florida condominium, a NOOK reader with Barnes & Noble gift card, and a $100 gift certificate to a local restaurant.

Bark in the Park’s 2012 goal is to raise $50,000 for Talbot Humane. The shelter has seen an 18-percent increase in the number of animals in its care over the past twelve months and has more than 200 animals now waiting for adoption. With the associated increase in expense for that care, Executive Director Patty Crankshaw-Quimby emphasizes that the need for community support for Bark in the Park is greater than ever.

“We deeply appreciate the help that businesses and members of the community provided to Bark in the Park last year,” she said. “Please support the animals once again with your contributions, then come out and have some fun with us in October.”

For more information, to make a contribution, or to volunteer, call Talbot Humane at 410-822-0107 or visit www.talbothumane.org.

In photo: L.P. Palmer and his Yorkshire Terrier, Jake, won both Best Look Alike and Best in Show in the 2011 Bark in the Park Dog Show.

In photo: Entrants take a walk around the show ring after last year’s Fun Dog Show.

Nonprofit Organization Feeds Eastern Shore Pets in Need

Pet Pantries, a new Maryland nonprofit corporation, recently formed to support pets in need on the Eastern Shore. The organization’s mission is to keep the pet food pantries of Baywater Animal Rescue, Caroline Humane, and Talbot Humane filled year round.

Pet Pantries is the only independent nonprofit with 501(c)(3) pending on Maryland’s Eastern Shore assisting multiple Humane pet food pantries.

“We founded Pet Pantries after reading a heart-wrenching front-page story last fall about Dorchester Humane having to turn away owners in need of food for their pets,” says Pet Pantries President Barbara Mulready. “There is such a high demand for pet food in this area and we exist because the community needs us. Our goal is to keep pets out of the shelters and in their homes. When people come to Humanes’ pantries asking for food, that’s where our supplies come in.”

Humane organizations typically have two separate food supplies: one to feed the Humane’s pets internally and one to provide food for the public. Pet Pantries works to stock the public food pantry, serving pet owners who have fallen on hard times during challenging economical times.

“We have over 200 people using our Pet Food Pantry and gave out 18,000 pounds of food last year,” says Suzette Stitely, executive director of Baywater Animal Rescue (formerly Dorchester Humane Society). “There’s no doubt in my mind that without this service, many pets would go hungry. We see many people who really have to depend on us to feed their pets.”

Similar to food pantries for humans, Pet Pantries accepts donations and pet food through events, food drives, and community efforts combined. The organization has held pet food drives in local schools, fitness centers, retirement centers, and local businesses.

“We have been overwhelmed and humbled by the tremendous support we have received from the community, remarks Mulready. “From students and businesses organizing pet food drives to dedicated individuals going the extra mile to pick up donations, we are extremely thankful to all of our volunteers and supporters.”

Since its establishment in January 2012, Pet Pantries has been highly successful, collecting 8,000 lbs. of cat and dog food to date. Pet Pantries will be launching several new fundraising initiatives in the fall.

“We are the voice of the pets that cannot ask for help,” Mulready says. “We are always seeking support from the community and invite the public to visit our new website to learn how they can get involved.”

About Pet Pantries

Pet Pantries is a Maryland nonprofit organization that formed in January 2012. Its mission is to keep Bay Water Animal Rescue (formerly Dorchester Humane), Caroline, and Talbot Humanes’ pet food pantries filled. These pet food pantries are used like food pantries. They enable their owners to keep their furry friends at home, especially during difficult economic times. For more information or to make a donation, either as an individual or a business, visit www.petpantries.org.

Talbot Humane Celebrates Success Of Second Bark In The Park

Talbot Humane is celebrating the success of its second annual Bark in the Park, which took place on October 15th at Idlewild Park in Easton. “The dogs and the people they brought out had an absolutely terrific time,” said event chairman John Barron.

Bark in the Park debuted last year and immediately became the organization’s major fundraising effort of the year, along with becoming a popular community event. More than 70 volunteers and staff worked year-round to stage the festival. “I couldn’t be prouder of what we all have accomplished,” Barron added.

While tallies on proceeds from Bark in the Park, including sponsorships and online fundraising, have not been finalized, with donations still being received, both Barron and Talbot Humane Executive Director Patty Crankshaw-Quimby are delighted with the projected increase over last year’s successful event.

Volunteers also participated in the online fundraising effort, with Charlie Petosa and Charles Riter earning Highest Youth Fundraiser and Highest Adult Fundraiser honors, respectively.

About twenty business sponsors, led by Annapolis Volvo, and numerous individuals supported Talbot Humane and Bark in the Park with cash and in-kind donations. Almost $7000 more was raised on site during the event itself.

Not only a fundraising effort, Bark in the Park also was a day of fun for all members of the family. Quimby estimates that about 500 people and 200 dogs came out for the festival, making for what she called a “very entertaining” day.

Family dogs could be entered in both the Dog Walk and Dog Show. The Show offered prizes in categories including tallest and smallest, tricks and costumes, look-alikes, and more. L.P. Palmer and his Yorkshire Terrier, Jake, won both Best Look Alike and Best in Show. Even those without pets could enjoy demonstrations of canine athletes by Agility and Frisbee Dogs, Delmarva DockDogs®, and the Easton Police K-9 Unit.

In addition, the event provided exposure for a number of local animal welfare organizations and opportunities for the public to learn more about animal care.

Queen Anne’s County Animal Services, Dorchester Humane, Halo’s Haven Rescue, Pets on Wheels and Maryland Votes for Animals all were represented, some of them bringing dogs available for adoption to participate in the PAWrade of Adoptable Dogs.

Local veterinarians conducted informal mini-workshops on selected pet-care topics. Participating facilities included Community Animal Hospital, Mid-Atlantic Cat Hospital, Spay Now, Pet Health Clinic, Veterinary Medical Center and All Pets Veterinary Hospital.

Talbot Humane receives no financial support from national animal welfare groups and relies on local community support to maintain its services, making Bark in the Park even more important to the organization, according to Quimby. “I am ecstatic with the day’s results. It was everything we hoped for,” she said, adding, “we are already looking forward to next year.”

For more information, to make a contribution, or to volunteer, call Talbot Humane at 410-822-0107 or visit www.talbothumane.org.

In photo: Charlie Petosa, left, and Charles Riter were the Highest Youth Fundraiser and Highest Adult Fundraiser, respectively, for the Bark in the Park online fundraising effort.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In top photo: L.P. Palmer and his Yorkshire Terrier, Jake, won both Best Look Alike and Best in Show in this year’s Bark in the Park Dog Show.

Talbot Humane Employee Honored

A Talbot Humane customer service representative has been awarded Employee of the Quarter honors. Ashley Marshall was selected for the recognition by her co-workers for her dedication and compassion in her care of the shelter’s animals.

In support of the award nomination, Ashley’s co-workers recognized her for “her willingness to do whatever needs to be done, her compassion for the animals and for being a lot of fun to work with.”

Marshall lives in Easton and has been a member of the Talbot Humane staff since 2004. The honor is awarded to the employee who best exemplifies compassion to the animals, teamwork with co-workers and overall performance.

Executive Director, Brian Metcalf, congratulated Marshall and thanked her for her love and care for the animals. “This is our highest honor for Talbot Humane’s staff,” said Metcalf. “Please join us in recognizing Ashley for her six and one half years of outstanding service to the animals and our community.”

For more information, to make a contribution, or to volunteer, call Talbot Humane at 410-822-0107 or visit www.talbothumane.org.

Talbot Humane Honors Volunteer Fundraisers

Talbot Humane recently recognized the volunteer fundraisers who contributed to the success of its First Annual Bark in the Park dog walk and family festival at Idlewild Park on October 16. More than seventy volunteers and a hundred sponsors came together to make the inaugural event what chairman John Barron called “a significant success” for the organization.

Using online fundraising tools, Talbot Humane enlisted volunteers to create personal web pages that encouraged their friends, associates and family members to sponsor their participation in the event. Individuals could sign up sponsors for themselves as dog walkers or simply as supporters of the organization. Totals were posted online, adding a competitive element to participation.

Seven of the top fundraisers were honored by Talbot Humane for their efforts. In first place was Barbara Jefferson, followed by Patty Crankshaw-Quimby, Sandy Hale, Jen Frye and Marilyn Serino. The top two fundraisers in the kids division were Charlie Petosa and Kelsey Abbott. Together, the seven raised more than $6,000 for the animals cared for by Talbot Humane.

Barbara Mulready, Fundraising Chair on the Talbot Humane Board, added her appreciation to the Town of Easton and the Main Street Business Association for their support in staging the event. “The generosity of the town and our business sponsors to the volunteers who came to them for help clearly made an enormous difference to our ability to get the most out of Bark in the Park for the animals,” she said.

Barron thanked the volunteer fundraisers and the donors who supported them. “This success demonstrates what creative efforts can do to help meet the challenges Talbot Humane faces,” he said.

“The online fundraising prior to Bark in the Park really contributed to the excitement leading up to the event,” added Barron. “That these individuals, both adults and kids, along with all the others who participated, made such a great effort to help Talbot Humane shows how important the organization and its work are to this community.”

For more information, to make a contribution, or to volunteer, call Talbot Humane at 410-822-0107 or visit www.talbothumane.org.

Talbot Humane’s Bark In The Park Is A Significant Success For The Animals

Talbot Humane’s First Annual Bark in the Park has set a high standard for subsequent events, according to event chairman John Barron. “It was awesome to see so many dogs bring their owners out to Idlewild Park for such a great time,” he said. “People and pets thoroughly enjoyed themselves.” About 70 dog walkers participated in the Grand Dog Walk, with many more from the community coming out to enjoy the festival events and activities.

Bark in the Park was an important fundraiser for the organization that has been doubly challenged by the slow economy, with reduced adoptions and increased responsibilities and costs to care for pets people can no longer afford to keep. More than seventy volunteers and a hundred sponsors came together to make the event what Barron called a significant success.

With two dozen vendors and exhibitors, plus music and carriage rides, canine shows and demonstrations, Bark in the Park had activities appealing to the whole family, including its four-legged members. There were more than sixty participants in the Dog Show, which Barron said was a hit with all the dogs in the audience. “We want to thank the entire community for coming out to participate and helping the animals of Talbot Humane,” said Barron.

Barbara Mulready, Fundraising Chair on the Talbot Humane Board, particularly expressed the organization’s appreciation to the Town of Easton and the Main Street Business Association for their support in staging the event. “Our donors, sponsors, vendors, exhibitors and, most of all, our volunteers and staff deserve a great round of applause for their efforts in putting this event together so superbly,” Mulready added.

While final tallies on proceeds from Bark in the Park, including its online fundraising campaign, have not yet been compiled, Barron is very pleased with preliminary numbers greatly exceeding the modest expectations for this first-time event.

“With the challenges Talbot Humane faces, creative efforts such as Bark in the Park will be increasingly important in our overall ability to provide exceptional care for the animals waiting to find their forever homes,” he explained. “For this small organization to pull off such a successful first-year effort shows what dedication, hard work, and the support of the community can accomplish. We can’t thank everyone enough for all they have done for the animals of Talbot Humane.”

For more information, to make a contribution, or to volunteer, call Talbot Humane at 410-822-0107 or visit www.talbothumane.org.

Youngster Makes Birthday Donation To Talbot Humane

Talbot Humane had some generous young donors and fundraisers for its recent Bark in the Park festival at Idlewild Park on October 16, according to Executive Director Brian Metcalf. One of them, ten-year-old Charlie Petosa, shown here with Metcalf, is the son of Anne and Charlie Petosa of Easton. The youngster not only raised $275 for the organization on his own, but also asked friends and family for donations in lieu of gifts for his birthday, celebrated the following day.

Charlie raised an additional $145 at his birthday party, plus received donations of dog food and a dog crate. He brought the contributions, along with a special card received form his friend Gray Benson, to the Adoption Center, where he was thanked by Metcalf for his extraordinary generosity.

“We are continually overwhelmed by the support of our community, from major businesses to our youngest residents, in rallying to the critical needs of the animals in our care,” said Metcalf.

For more information, to make a contribution, or to volunteer, call Talbot Humane at 410-822-0107 or visitwww.talbothumane.org.

Talbot Humane Receives Children’s Donation

Talbot Humane’s Executive Director, Brian Metcalf, center, was touched recently by the unexpected generosity of two youngsters.

Seven-year-old Fiona Guinness, right, and her brother Jack, four, of Newcomb each were given $25 checks for Christmas by their father’s employer. They were told they could give the money to any charity they wished.

They both chose Talbot Humane because “we love animals,” they told Metcalf. Not only did they make the donation, but they and their parents, Ken and Melissa Guinness, took home a five-week-old kitten to provide it with a foster home until there is room enough for it to return to theAdoption Center.

For more information, to make a contribution, or to volunteer, call Talbot Humane at 410-822-0107 or visit www.talbothumane.org.

Bark In The Park To Feature Chick-fil-A Cow

The Chick-fil-A Cow will be appearing at Talbot Humane’s Bark in the Park on Saturday, October 16, at Easton’s Idlewild Park. Chick-fil-A is one of more than fifty sponsors that have joined in support of Talbot Humane’s new event. The eatery’s mascot is shown here with some young fans at the George Murphy Community Pool in Easton.

Bark in the Park will feature a Grand Dog Walk and activities for the entire family, including canine members. A Chinese Auction will also be held, with a $2,500 value. Dog walkers and fundraisers can sign up online at www.tinyurl.com/Bark-in-the-Park.

“Talbot Humane’s fundraisers and sponsors have gotten off to a great start,” said John Barron, event chairman and Talbot Humane board member, “but there is still a way to go to the finish line. We are delighted with the support we have received so far and thank the community for all it has done to make Bark in the Park a success.”

“There is still time to join the fun and sign up to walk in the event or help raise funds for the animals,” he added.

For more information, to make a contribution, or to volunteer, call Talbot Humane at 410-822-0107 or visit www.talbothumane.org.